Log in

Log in

 

mail@authorsguildoftn.org    +1.865.254-3054 and 865.657-9560.

Join our E-zine "The Book Shelf"

Sign up to read blogs, short stories and the latest news, so be the FIRST to receive our quarterly e-zine "The Book Shelf"  You will receive a confirmation email, do check your SPAM mailbox. You need to confirm this email to validate your subscription.

Thank you AGT.

Member Postings

In our blog we post interesting news, events, member specifics and other items. You can subscribe to our blog or categories of our blog. If you do you will be notified by email whenever we post a new entry in our blog.
Featured

Dandridge Mercantile -- our latest store

Owners Tracey Bommarito and Sue McCall met each other several years ago and bonded working on Santa shops, art projects, and later on, Sweet Repeats (Tracey’s twice a year children’s consignment shop). It was during the preparations for Sweet Repeats that they visualized the top floor of the old Gass building in historic downtown Dandridge as a shop where they would carry only items handmade or repurposed in Tennessee and occasionally, the surrounding states. A one stop shop for one of a kind items you won’t find anywhere else!

 
In addition to their unique crafts and home decor, they sought out books by Tennessee authors. As of August 9, 2018, the store is carrying about 70 titles by members of the Authors Guild of Tennessee.  All of the writers live in East Tennessee where some of their books are set. The genres include Southern Fiction, mysteries, fantasy, inspirational works, memoirs, historical, humorous essays, Christian fiction and non-fiction, and childrens books. 
 
Drop by and shop the wide-ranging selection for your reading pleasure or to purchase as gifts for family and friends. 
 
Rate this blog entry:
0
54 Hits
0 Comments
Featured

Authors Guild Car Magnet Uses

 
Tilmer Wright, Jr
Author of Motes and The Bit Dance
Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
1
Recent comment in this post
Cheryl Peyton
I think you just wanted to show us your 500L Fiat. Very nice. (Good ideas for the magnetized stickers, too.)
Monday, 23 July 2018 10:53
38 Hits
1 Comment
Featured

Conversations with Cody: Meet and Greet at Puppy School

Meet and Greet Day in Puppy School

Cody (on the left) was judged by the trainer as being the most polite of all the puppies because he approached the other dogs from the rear, the most mannerly method of introducing yourself in doggydom (as long as you keep all four paws on the ground.

We were so proud.

"Haven't we sniffed each other before? You smell familiar."

Rate this blog entry:
0
27 Hits
0 Comments
Featured

Ebook release of CONVERSATIONS WITH CODY: A sassy canine speaks his mind.

I have finally finished the conversion of Conversations with Cody to an Ebook ($2.99 special for anyone reading this, your friends and your friends' friends, and the mailman, etc.) Below is an excerpt from the first part of the book.

Starting School

Having failed in all areas of training, we registered Cody for Puppy School starting that September. He was four months old. We had aged considerably in that time. Cody was signed up for a full course load: Sit, Stay, Come, No bark, and No bite. (He was even toying with the idea of trying out for the football team.) 

I heard the girls like jocks.
 
 
 
Rate this blog entry:
1
38 Hits
0 Comments
Featured

Announcing the release of my book, CONVERSATIONS WITH CODY: A sassy canine speaks his mind

Available now in softcover on Amazon, my new book is a collection of imagined conversations with my self-possessed three-year-old Havanese dog. From the time we brought Cody home as a ten-week-old puppy, he showed an impudent attitude that I started putting into words in little dialogues I posted on Facebook. Friends liked these and eventually encouraged me to compile them into a book. The result is 125 pages of Cody’s take on dog-related topics like obedience training, boarding at a kennel, and neutering; to human-related topics like holiday celebrations, travel, and cyber-security.

Included in the book are suggestions for future dog owners based on my experiences with Cody. One is: Never get a puppy the same color as your floors; you can easily lose sight of him and panic; or you can trip over him and hurt yourself.

Although Cody got straight A’s in puppy school, he has been disdainful of commands since then.  For instance, if I call out “Come!” he runs in the other direction. If I tell him to get off the sofa, he rolls on his back to mock me. Therefore, in most of our little chats he is depicted as condescending and naughty. To be fair, he’s also loving and playful, which I hope comes across, as well.

The book is divided into: Puppyhood (or, the Days of Whine and Noses), The “Willful Ones,” the “Terrible Twos,” and the “Testy Threes.” Each page is complete with one conversation and photograph of the little scamp. It is written for anyone who has grown up loving dogs.

 

Here are a couple of excerpts:

First Stay in a Kennel

Me:"Cody, you'll have to stay at Small Paws next weekend."
Cody: "What? You're locking me up without a trial? Why? Did the sitter bail?"
Me: "No, she's just not available. It's a nice kennel. You’ll be able to play with other dogs and not stay in a cage."
Cody: "Will they put ice in my water?"
Me: "Probably not."
Cody: "How about giving me a treat when I do business outside?"
Me:"I don’t think so."
Cody: "Will they warm my food?"
Me: "I'm sure they won't."
Cody: "That’s it. I wanna see my lawyer.

Cody and my Birthday

Me:"Know what I'd like for my birthday?"
Cody: "I don't have any money. I don't even have pockets."
Me: "I don't want a present. I'd just like you to come when I call you for one day."
Cody: "No can do. That's a slippery slope. Leads to sitting and staying on command. Giving paw. Pretty soon I'll turn into a robot. People are losing jobs to robots."
Me: "That's a stretch and just an excuse."
Cody: "It's a principle. But I’ll compromise with you and not knock pillows off the couch just for today."

Rate this blog entry:
1
Recent Comments
Susan L Kite
Sound absolutely adorable. I used to do that with my cats. In fact your dog sounds mighty cat-like. Not sure Cody would like that ... Read More
Sunday, 15 July 2018 18:29
Cheryl Peyton
Thanks, Sue. Cody does have the independence of a cat, but he doesn't know what a cat is. I'm glad you've channeled the same anima... Read More
Sunday, 15 July 2018 18:39
76 Hits
2 Comments
Featured

Six Minutes to Midnight - Cheryl Peyton has a powerful ability to paint a picture with words

Cheryl Peyton has a powerful ability to paint a picture with words. Six Minutes to Midnight tells the story of federal agents, charged with the secure transport of nuclear weapons, and a sociopath bent on wreaking havoc on a variety of real and imagined tormentors. 

The characters are wonderful, and the best part of this thrilling story. I was particularly impressed with Albert, the primary antagonist. He’s so perfect as a bad guy that you find yourself intensely hating him early in the book. That sentiment doesn’t let up. It grows. The mania he displays is completely believable thanks to a comprehensive, three-dimensional portrait Peyton crafts along the way. 
I also liked Henry, who Albert recruits as an accomplice. Henry is wonderfully quirky and borderline insane, but a lot of fun. 
Dana, the main protagonist, is also very well done. She comes across just as solid and believable in her role as an agent for good as Albert does in his role as a veritable demon. 
The story moves swiftly and is packed with lots of action and well-researched detail. You will want to reserve a nice chunk of your day to read the last fourth or so of the book as it climbs to its thrilling conclusion. You might not be able to put it down during that part. I enjoyed this book and look forward to reading more from Cheryl Peyton. 
Note to parents: Six Minutes to Midnight is meant for adult audiences. There is a fair amount of profanity sprinkled around in it. None of it is gratuitous and it fits the personality and demeanor of the character responsible for 90% of it, but it’s there – including some “F-bombs” and the “g—d----” thing. It’s not excessive, but I would not recommend the book for kids. There are also some scenes with violence and one with a sexual assault. Again – not gratuitous. These scenes are essential to the storyline. I just always feel obligated to mention things like this in reviews so that parents can make informed decisions about reading material for their kids.

Rate this blog entry:
1
Recent comment in this post
Cheryl Peyton
Thank you so much, Tilmer. I'm especially pleased you felt the protagonists and antagonists were well-developed as I wanted the st... Read More
Thursday, 21 June 2018 17:27
113 Hits
1 Comment
Featured

Social inSecurity, the Sequel

I returned home from the Social Security office brimming with optimism. I had been treated courteously, taken seriously, and given a pathway to determine whether I was owed thousands of dollars in back retirement benefits. With my new-found hope I had to remind myself that my record still showed a zero contribution toward FICA (Federal Insurance Retirement Act) for the first four years of the 1970s when I had been employed by the Cook County Department of Public Aid. Agent Pickens’ words rang in my ears: “County departments back then commonly took deductions for a pension fund and didn’t pay into social security”. I was on a mission to find out if that was true in my case.  Was it possible I was eligible for a pension?

That evening I emailed my cousin in Chicago. Pat had worked for Social Security when I was with Public Aid and for many years after until she retired. Summarizing my situation in my note, I asked if she knew anything that could be helpful, or did she have any suggestions to track down records from the long-defunct county department.

Checking my computer the next morning, I was pleased to find an email from Pat with the name of a resource she thought might be useful: the State (of Illinois) Employee’s Retirement System, referred to as SERS. Is every government agency known by an acronym? Going to the site, I scanned down the list of thirty-plus topics along the side of the home page to start my search. I selected ‘Tier I Information’ which sounded like a good starting point.  Clicking on that, I then had to choose among seven sub-headings. Selecting the first one with the word ‘benefits,’ I was confronted with a chart of mathematical calculations and formulas for various years of employment and income levels. I felt a headache coming on.

I went back to the home page and clicked on topics at random, trying to discern exactly what SERS was and who was eligible for the System.  As I bounced around, I came across pictures of attractive grey-haired people, all laughing, as they walked hand-in-hand on a beach, or played with a grandchild, or even as they stared at a computer screen. From scraps of text I picked up along the way, I gleaned that SERS was an optional pension plan for civil service employees. One screen entitled ‘Legislation’ was a listing of House bills that had become laws. Clicking on some from my time and later, I noticed several had been signed off by former governors who were now cooling their heels in the state penitentiary. Were those laws still valid?

I finally decided my best bet was to go to the ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ to see if my query was even relevant. As I read through them I realized most laid out possible scenarios that might impact retired worker’s benefits; such as earning income after starting to receive a pension, or remarrying after the death of the spousal recipient. The most conscientious query had to be from the anxious retiree who wrote, “I am receiving a pension from SERS. If I die, (if?) what should be done with that month’s check?" (The entire amount would go to the estate of the deceased. Even the government isn’t that mercenary.)

Scrolling down to the bottom of the FAQs, I found the phone number for the Chicago office of SERS. I studied it for several seconds, debating whether I should call and how to summarize my situation to be routed to the appropriate person. Unconsciously, I tapped on the edges of the pile of Social Security correspondence to straighten it into a perfect rectangle, then glanced at a hornet bumping against the window screen. Shrugging, I picked up the phone’s receiver and punched in the number with the familiar area code of 312.  

Surprisingly, a live female voice answered on the second ring. Startled, I lost my words for a moment. “Uh, I’m a former employee of Public Aid, calling to check on my possible pension benefits from 1970 through 1973.” Silence on the other end. Did she think it was a prank call?

Her voice came back on, but with an edge. “You should be talking to the Cook County Pension Fund office,” she scolded.

“Yes, I think so,” I agreed. “Do you have that number?” She rattled it off like it was her own. “Thank you,” I gushed, grateful to have the number and to be able to conclude the conversation.

Without pausing to think about the next call, I pressed the numbers I had scribbled down. This time I got a menu. I held on to the bitter end when I could hit ‘0’ to speak to an agent. I was informed my wait time would be ten seconds. That’s a wait time? Even sooner a woman came on the line and volunteered her name. The personal touch seemed promising. I launched into my now-practiced spiel, starting with my beginning and end dates of employment with Public Aid, acknowledging the change to the State Department, and ending with the advice given to me by the agent at the Social Security office to check on whether I had paid into a pension fund.  

“What’s your name?” she asked reasonably.

I gave her my name, then advised that I had two different names during the four years I was without benefits:  my maiden name and my married name. I added the date of my marriage.  

She sighed but remained on the line. “What’s your social?” she said, using civil service speak for social security number. I gave it to her. “Just a minute. It’ll take me some time to go that far back into old records.”

“Thanks.”  She had to say far back and old like that?  I waited.

She came back on. “I see we didn’t use social security numbers back then. Just names.”  Egads. I was there before Social Security numbers were in common usage? That program started under Roosevelt.

“Is your middle name Jean?” she said suddenly.

"Yes,” I gasped in amazement.

“I found your record,” she enthused, like it was an archeological discovery.

“Oh, good!” I was equally excited. “What does it show for my pension or social security?”

I heard papers being shuffled. “Here it is. You paid into the Cook County pension fund from March of 1970 through December 31st of 1973. You opted to take it out in a lump sum at that time when the department was brought under the State.”

My shoulders slumped as my mind went back to when my first husband and I purchased a Victorian home listed on the historic registry at that time. It had sloping floors, leaky plumbing, windows that rattled with the slightest breeze, and the odor of cat urine in the back bedroom on the second floor. The offer of a lump sum pension payment had been irresistible. I needed the money and I was decades away from retirement. “That’s right. I remember doing that,” I said quietly. “Do you have the amount?”

“Yes. It was $2,696 dollars and twenty cents.”  I wondered how much that was in today’s money; but it didn’t matter.

“Thank you so much for finding that information for me.” I tried to keep my voice positive.

“No problem at all. Anything else I can help you with?” You could call a suicide hot line and they would ask you that same question.

“That’s all. Thanks again.” I slowly hung up the receiver. I had come to the end of my quest. I was no worse off, although it felt like I had just lost something. After a moment, I shook my head and exhaled. I had at least done myself credit to follow through and cut a little red tape. Time to move on.

And that Victorian house? My husband swore he had seen the ghost of an old man several times in the upstairs hallway. We renovated it and sold it after only nine months for a tidy profit. I hadn’t lost my benefits; I had reinvested them in a haunted house.  Sounds about right.

 

The End

 

 

 

 

Rate this blog entry:
4
Recent Comments
Tilmer Wright Jr.
A great conclusion to an engaging story. Thanks, Cheryl. I actually enjoyed reading this. I love the vivid depiction of the old ho... Read More
Monday, 11 June 2018 16:41
Cheryl Peyton
Thanks, Tilmer. Glad you enjoyed it. And all of it was true.
Monday, 11 June 2018 16:53
80 Hits
3 Comments
Featured

Social inSecurity

I sat in the car dreading to go inside. I was overdue by ten years, so why go in now? Worse yet,  I wasn’t any more prepared to be there than I had been a decade earlier. For years I had regularly passed by the neo-classical grey stone building set behind a car dealership on Kingston Pike, often thinking I should stop. Now I was parked in front of it. The two-story structure looked more like the executive offices of a corporation than a government building. Only the block letters attached to the façade gave away its bureaucratic identity: SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION. 

I took a deep breath and slowly exhaled as I glanced at the bulging Pentax folder containing Social Security mailings that was on the passenger seat. Little of it was helpful, but it was all I had. I checked my watch. Almost noon. It was time to go in. I snatched up the file and shouldered my purse. Out of the car I clicked the door lock and started off towards the glass-walled entryway. Reaching into my purse I fingered my birth certificate and passport to reassure myself I could prove who I was if nothing else.

At the door, I glanced back over my shoulder to see if anyone else was coming, but there was no one around. I thought the place would be very busy on a Monday. An hour earlier I had called the agency with the foolish notion I could make an appointment to avoid the crowds. After enduring a long-winded menu of irrelevant options, I was told my wait time to speak to a human being (agent) was 45 minutes. I could make the drive in less time, so I took off. When I first pulled into the lot I cringed to see there weren’t any spaces in the first few rows. Looking more closely, I realized they were all the same two makes of cars and trucks sold by the dealership in front. Chuckling at my stupidity, I drove on and had mhy pick of parking spots.   

Now, entering the building, I followed the ceramic-tiled hallway that led to a waiting area where about fifty people sat facing me. The person in charge appeared to be a security guard who was seated behind a counter on one side of the doorway. On the other side stood two machines bearing signs that read, Check In Here. A middle-aged woman was using the first one, so I went around to the second and tentatively pressed the Start button on the glass, worried that I wouldn’t have the right responses. The first screens were straightforward enough: preferred language, name, social security number. The final screen was more challenging: What is the reason for your visit? I wasn’t there to apply for any benefits, or to change my name, or to replace my social security card, or any other listed purpose. The last option was the only one that fit: Other Business. I hit that. Fortunately, I wasn’t asked for any details and the machine spat out a slip of paper with a number printed on it: O366. It seemed depressingly high.

With my ticket in hand, I surveyed the people waiting. Judging by the slumped postures and widespread use of reading materials, it looked like most of them had been there for quite a while. Several young, healthy-looking people interspersed among them had probably come along for company or as drivers. Stepping over to the security guard, I mewed, “What is the typical wait time with this many people?” 

He shrugged before answering, “An hour and a half…give or take.” I couldn’t help but jut out my lower lip in response, so he added,. “Could take less, depending what people are here for.” 

I nodded and managed a wan smile in appreciation of his effort to be encouraging, then turned and sat down on a chair in the front row that had an empty seat on either side. Setting down my purse and file, I looked around to scope out the room to figure out the setup in case my number was ever called. The two side walls had openings that led to inner passageways fitted with bank teller-type windows about every ten feet. Unfortunately, most of the windows I could see had their shades pulled down. Signs were posted on each side of the room.  The sign on the left wall read, Windows 1-11. The sign on the right wall read, Windows 12-22. At the back of the waiting area were five more windows, each with a letter sign, A through E. Twenty-seven windows in all. I brightened. That meant there shouldn’t be more than two claimants waiting for each window.

My cell phone chirped with an incoming email.  I pulled up the message: Newsmax wanted to know if I was at risk for Alzheimer’s. Probably. I opened my other emails and answered the few personal ones. After several minutes, a female voice came over the loudspeaker directing number C48 to report to Window 12. C48? I checked my slip again to see if I had misread it. No. Sadly, it was still O366.  What kind of numbering system was this? Looking around for some explanation, my attention became drawn to the TV monitor set up in the front of the room. At the bottom of the screen were five sets of letter and number combinations; the first was O354, the second was C48, and three others followed that also appeared to have no rhyme or reason. At least I could see where my number fit into the scheme of things. I was behind O354. Twelve ahead of me. Not great, but not as bad as I thought.

Now that my wait time was measurable I had to mentally nail down my story that would convince an agent that Social Security owed me money going back ten years although I couldn’t prove it. My original Benefits Statement showed zero-taxed earnings for the years 1970 through 1973, the first 4 years I had been employed by the Cook County Department of Public Aid in Chicago. When I received the statement, I had made a couple of phone calls to dispute the record, but hadn’t gotten past the question, “Do you have pay stubs to prove it?” Does anyone keep pay stubs for thirty years? I had given up and regretted that ever since. Recently, it dawned on me that 1973 was probably the year the County Department became a state agency. My Cook County records must not have been transferred. My hope was that the Social Security people could get access to the records of the now-defunct department.

Glumly, I turned my attention back to the monitor that was running a loop of announcements and bits of trivia for entertainment. The list of the current top ten names for babies came on screen. “Olivia” surprised me by coming in at number two for girls, and how could “Liam” be the number one name for boys? Several messages regarding social security policies and procedures for application came up on the slide show. My favorite was, “If you are deaf, call the number below to request sign-language assistance for your next appointment.” Right. Messages were repeated in Spanish, which was understandable, but one version appeared to be in Cyrillic. How many claimants in Knoxville were from Russia or Eastern Europe?

Every few minutes, the same female announcer’s voice called out another number to report to a particular window. I had noticed that few windows were being called: only Windows A and B, 9, 12 and 20 so far.  Aha. Five windows corresponded to the five sets of letter and number combinations. Apparently the other 17 windows were unmanned today. Great. However, my number had now crept up to being only two down.  

I stretched my neck and shoulders and sat up straight. A few new people were standing in the waiting room doorway. Observing them, I saw they all knew the drill, going directly to the check-in machines, rapidly tapping on the screen and taking their numbers without even glancing at them.

The amplified female voice came back on. “O366 to Window 20.” That was me. I had calculated where Window 20 should be so I jumped out of my chair and headed for the doorway that would be closest to it. I was right. The window screen was up, and I took a seat to face my opponent. He turned out to be a balding, middle-aged bureaucratic type with a pen-protector in his shirt pocket. He greeted me politely and asked for my identification. I dealt out my full hand of social security card, driver’s license, passport, and birth certificate. His head shot back a little. “Just your card and driver’s license are fine.”

After looking them over he glanced at me. Apparently satisfied, he clicked keys on his computer.  “What’s your mother’s maiden name?”

“Carlson.”

“No, her maiden name.

Her maiden name and married name are the same,” I responded, wanting to clarify that my parents weren’t related and there are few Swedish surnames, but I refrained.

He made a few more clicks, then leaned back and steepled his fingers. “So, how can I help you today?”

I launched into the facts of my work history, including my exact starting date of March 3, 1969, to give myself credibility. Handing over the Social Security Benefits Statement, I pointed out the “0” amount of contributions shown for the contested years.

He studied the statement with pursed lips for several moments before looking up. “Do you have any pay stubs from this time period?” 

I struggled to keep my expression neutral.  “I’m sorry. I don’t.”

He waved his hand dismissively. “No, of course not. That’s understandable.” He stabbed the statement with an index finger. “I believe you that you worked these years, and I want you to get every dime that’s coming to you. It’s just that we need some proof.”

I nodded solemnly. “I was hoping Social Security could get access to Cook County records,” I said softly.

He sighed and shook his head. “I think you should go to the IRS for that. We base our payments on their records.”

I was sure my lower lip had jutted out again.

He turned back to his computer, his forehead scrunched in thought. After several seconds his face cleared, he swung out of his chair, and stood. “I’ll be right back. There’s another agent who’s had more experience with this.” With what exactly, I wondered.

As promised, my agent soon returned with another 50-something man in tow who introduced himself as Agent Pickens. He told me he had been briefed on my case, but asked a few questions about my work history. After a short discussion he said, “I don’t want you to get your hopes up,” No problem there. “but I’m going to flag your case for a month to scour any records for your social.” (security number)

I was getting my hopes up. “Thanks. Anything that might help.”

Agent Pickens looked off into space. “What I’m afraid of,” he drawled, “is that prior to 1973 many county departments didn’t pay into social security but into a pension fund instead. I think you should call Cook County pensions and see if you can get connected to someone who’s been around for a while who may remember. Maybe they owe you pension money.”

The ball was back in my court, but I wasn’t going to give up this time. I would call the Pension Board. I would also contact an old friend who worked at Public Aid the same years I did and see what social security she was receiving. I would even contact a cousin who's retired from Social Security to see if she has any ideas.

I thanked both of the agents for their time and help. Agent Pickens handed me his personal business card. “Call me if you learn anything and I’ll do the same.” They both smiled and wished me luck.

Making my way back to the waiting room, I checked my watch. It wasn’t yet two o’clock. Passing by the security guard, I held up my wrist and tapped on my watch face. “You were right about the time.”

The guard beamed and I smiled back, heading out the door no richer, but having a plan and feeling better about myself.  

 

THE END

 

Rate this blog entry:
7
Recent Comments
Susan L Kite
Oh, boy, social security is the great equalizer. Does this sound familiar! Thanks for the smile, Cheryl.
Saturday, 26 May 2018 14:40
Cheryl Peyton
Thanks, Susan. It is that. But as a former civil servant, I tried to present a balanced report. It really wasn't so bad.... Read More
Saturday, 26 May 2018 15:15
Kaye George
I dealt with SS after my husband died and, though it IS a bureaucracy, it went fairly smoothly. I was officially told, though, exa... Read More
Saturday, 26 May 2018 16:10
118 Hits
9 Comments
Featured

New: The Book Shelf Magazine April 2018

EzinApril201_20180412-143154_1

Please feel free to pass THE BOOK SHELF to your friends and family. We're so pleased with Nadine Richmond's accomplishment as editor and producer.  Thank you to all the other authors for helping in the first edition. The second edition will be in three months.

Click on this link The Book Shelf Magazine April 2018, you will be re-directed to another site. Or click on READ MORE to view the EZiNE on this site.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
1
178 Hits
0 Comments
Featured

Inspirational Writing for April 7, 2018

Some of the most important things we do in life are not what we want to do or what we have to do, but what we feel we need to do. These are what show some of our greatest traits of compassion, empathy, and kindness.

Rate this blog entry:
3
Recent comment in this post
Cindy Leihkauff
So true. Unfortunately, the "need to-do things" are the most easily procrastinated. Thanks for the inspiration.
Monday, 09 April 2018 09:50
77 Hits
1 Comment
Featured

Inspirational Writing for April 6, 2018

Knowing what makes you happy in life is realizing what makes you smile, makes you laugh, makes you want to do for others, and gives you hope for the future. When you find those things, share them with someone else and enjoy the happiness.

Rate this blog entry:
2
Recent comment in this post
Cheryl Peyton
Thanks for your inspirational thoughts, Randy. I think you hit upon a lot of truths that are helpful to reflect on.
Friday, 06 April 2018 10:00
107 Hits
1 Comment
Featured

Future Book Signing at Barnes and Nobel, Chattanooga

Kelly Flemings, Community Business Deveopment Manager at Barnes and Nobel, Chattanooga, recently contacted new AGT member, Denise Sherriff, to discuss a future book signing for her book, Kairos Moments. at his store, tentatively scheduled for Saturday, March 24.

He advised Denise that he was very impressed with her book and the presentation she left for him. He has ordered copies to sell in the store. 

Congratulations to Denise. We're all proud of you. 

Rate this blog entry:
1
173 Hits
0 Comments

Inspirational Writing for August 22, 2018

Seldom is our influence on others more significant than how we react to disappointment in our life. Disappointment has a way of bringing out the true nature of a person. How we handle disappointment is seen by others and leaves an impression on them they do not forget.

Rate this blog entry:
1
12 Hits
0 Comments

Inspirational Writing for August 21, 2018

Every day, you must carry with you the tools to succeed. Those tools are innovative thinking, a willingness to learn, and a positive attitude. With these tools, you are expanding your thinking and absorbing as much knowledge as possible while maintaining an optimistic outlook.

Rate this blog entry:
1
20 Hits
0 Comments

Inspirational Writing for August 20, 2018

What if there was a mirror that reflected what’s in your heart rather than an image in the mirror. We often try to hide things in our heart that others never know. Thinking about the reflection you’d see, would your heart be one of love or one of confusion?

Rate this blog entry:
0
11 Hits
0 Comments

Inspirational Writing for August 19, 2018

As a Christian, it’s a bit contradictory to hit people over the head with your Bible when you talk about God’s love. Maybe it would be more effective if we figuratively showed them how to stand on the Bible to help them see a happier life.

Rate this blog entry:
0
15 Hits
0 Comments

Inspirational Writing for August 18, 2018

We all have clouds in our life. These clouds are the problems, annoyances, and nuisances that we have no controls over. It’s easy to let these clouds hide the sunshine in our lives. Try to look through the clouds and enjoy the sunshine that shines above them.

Rate this blog entry:
0
17 Hits
0 Comments

Inspirational Writing for August 17, 2018

Most of the things that guide us happen early in life. As we get older, those things may become challenged or blurred. Whether you change at that point or not, be careful what controls your life doesn’t make you less loving, compassionate, or forget where you came from.

Rate this blog entry:
0
13 Hits
0 Comments

Inspirational Writing for August 16, 2018

A memory is the capturing of a moment in our life that touched our heart, changed our lives, or brought us closer to those we love. It’s sometimes all we have left when all that’s left is us.

Rate this blog entry:
0
11 Hits
0 Comments

Inspirational Writing for August 15, 2018

Getting mad about something just to prove a point only creates more problems that you’ll have to apologize for later. It’s hard enough sometimes to explain why you’re mad, but just to prove a point is impossible to justify to anyone.

Rate this blog entry:
0
11 Hits
0 Comments

Recent Comments

Cheryl Peyton Authors Guild Car Magnet Uses
23 July 2018
I think you just wanted to show us your 500L Fiat. Very nice. (Good ideas for the magnetized stickers, too.)
Cheryl Peyton Announcing the release of my book, CONVERSATIONS WITH CODY: A sassy canine speaks his mind
15 July 2018
Thanks, Sue. Cody does have the independence of a cat, but he doesn't know what a cat is. I'm glad you've channeled the same animal thoughts I have. Makes me feel a lot less crazy.
Susan L Kite Announcing the release of my book, CONVERSATIONS WITH CODY: A sassy canine speaks his mind
15 July 2018
Sound absolutely adorable. I used to do that with my cats. In fact your dog sounds mighty cat-like. Not sure Cody would like that comparison.
Cheryl Peyton Realms of the Cat
06 July 2018
Congratulations, Sue. Great cover. Sounds like a very creative story.
Cheryl Peyton Six Minutes to Midnight - Cheryl Peyton has a powerful ability to paint a picture with words
21 June 2018
Thank you so much, Tilmer. I'm especially pleased you felt the protagonists and antagonists were well-developed as I wanted the story to be character-driven. Appreciate your kind words and the caveat regarding younger readers.

Subscribe to our Blog

Contact

Authors Guild of Tennessee Contact Details

AGT Telephone info     1.865.254.3054

  782 Meadow Walk Lane
  Lenoir City, TN 37772

SiteLock

What members say

Do review some of our member testimonials and see how the Authors Guild of TN community enjoys our collaboration, services and solutions. If you want to share your opinion, feel free to submit a review. We appreciate your input very much.
 

View Testimonials

Membership

AGT has over 40 member authors who have collectively written more than 200 books in different genres such as: Children’s Literature, Fantasy, Humor, Science Fiction, Thriller, Memoir, Creative Nonfiction, Romance, History, True-Life, Religion and Western Novels.

Meet the Members of the Authors Guild of Tennesee

Subscribe to Our Ezine ~ the Bookshelf

The Authors Guild of Tennessee publishes quarterly an Ezine the Bookshelf, which is emailed to subscribers. We do not share your information with 3rd parties and you can always opt out of the Ezine.

We will send you an email to confirm your subscription. Please white-list mail from our site.